Wednesday, January 11, 2006

Takeshima's Day

On Mar 1716 2005, Shimane prefectural assembly almost unanimously adopted "Takeshima's Day" as Feb 22 every year.


This did not please some "patriotic" Koreans: Choi Jae-ik, a member of the municipal assembly of Seoul, who was visiting Japan to stop "Takeshima's Day" from being enacted, attempted to break into the prefectural congress of Shimane, with a knife in his hand.


A fanatic Korean woman cuts off her fingers to display protest to "Takeshima's Day".


One of the leaders of "Hwal-bin-dan", a Korean right-wing activist group, is biting away Japan's national flag into pieces.

Maybe it's a Korean custom to enjoy eating flags when they find something frustrating. :p


See also: Takeshima

Tags:

2 Comments:

At 31 March, 2006 09:57, Blogger MellonC said...

Dokdo is an isolated island in the eastern reaches of the nation's territory. It is located 87.4㎞ southeast of Ulleungdo Island.

Dokdo Island (180,902m²) is formed from a volcanic rock. The island is located at a latitude of 37°14' north and a longitude of 131°52' east.

Along with Ulleungdo Island, Dokdo Island was one part of a country called Usanguk. According to records, Usanguk became part of the Silla dynasty (57B.C. ~ 935 A.D.) in June of the 13th year that King Jijeung ruled Silla. Isabu (a general and politician of Silla) gained enough strength at that time to take over Usanguk.

In the Seongjong Memoir of the Joseon dynasty, there are passages by Kim Jaju describing Dokdo Island (called Sambongdo at that time). Dokdo was called 'Sambongdo', 'Gajido' or 'Usando', but the name was changed to Dokdo in 1881. The name 'Dokdo' was first used in 1906 by the Headman of Ulleung County Sim Heungtaek. In 1914, Dokdo Island officially became an administrative district of the Gyeongsangbuk-do Province.

After The Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592, Japanese fishermen often came near Ulleungdo and Dokdo. Sukjong Sillok, the Annals of King Sukjong(1674-1720), records that An Yongbok went twice to Japan in order to protest against Japanese nationals trespassing into Korean territory. He asked the Japanese authorities to recognize Korea's sovereignty over these islands and to forbid Japanese nationals to sail to these islands.

Dokdo Island is composed of two main islets, Dongdo (East Island)and Seodo (West Island), as well as 36 rock islets. Dongdo (98 meters above sea level) has a crater. Seodo (168 meters above sea level) does not have a crater but it is also made of volcanic rocks. Between Dongdo and Seodo is the Hyeongjegul Cave, and there is the Cheonsanggul Cave on Dongdo. Over time, other caves and topographic features of the island have formed due to weathering and erosion.

Japan acknowledged the value of Dokdo Island after the Russo-Japanese War of 1905. Japan unilaterally transferred Dokdo Island to Shimane Prefecture, Japan and renamed it "Dakesima". A few authorities in Japan have continuously declared their dominion,
over the island, which led to diplomatic
conflicts between Korea and Japan. It is still
unresolved.
Presently there are security guards on Dokdo Island. Houses were built on the rocks as well as a small harbor. Some fresh water have also been found on the island, supplying safe drinking water for its inhabitants.

 
At 31 March, 2006 09:58, Blogger MellonC said...

Dokdo is an isolated island in the eastern reaches of the nation's territory. It is located 87.4㎞ southeast of Ulleungdo Island.

Dokdo Island (180,902m²) is formed from a volcanic rock. The island is located at a latitude of 37°14' north and a longitude of 131°52' east.

Along with Ulleungdo Island, Dokdo Island was one part of a country called Usanguk. According to records, Usanguk became part of the Silla dynasty (57B.C. ~ 935 A.D.) in June of the 13th year that King Jijeung ruled Silla. Isabu (a general and politician of Silla) gained enough strength at that time to take over Usanguk.

In the Seongjong Memoir of the Joseon dynasty, there are passages by Kim Jaju describing Dokdo Island (called Sambongdo at that time). Dokdo was called 'Sambongdo', 'Gajido' or 'Usando', but the name was changed to Dokdo in 1881. The name 'Dokdo' was first used in 1906 by the Headman of Ulleung County Sim Heungtaek. In 1914, Dokdo Island officially became an administrative district of the Gyeongsangbuk-do Province.

After The Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592, Japanese fishermen often came near Ulleungdo and Dokdo. Sukjong Sillok, the Annals of King Sukjong(1674-1720), records that An Yongbok went twice to Japan in order to protest against Japanese nationals trespassing into Korean territory. He asked the Japanese authorities to recognize Korea's sovereignty over these islands and to forbid Japanese nationals to sail to these islands.

Dokdo Island is composed of two main islets, Dongdo (East Island)and Seodo (West Island), as well as 36 rock islets. Dongdo (98 meters above sea level) has a crater. Seodo (168 meters above sea level) does not have a crater but it is also made of volcanic rocks. Between Dongdo and Seodo is the Hyeongjegul Cave, and there is the Cheonsanggul Cave on Dongdo. Over time, other caves and topographic features of the island have formed due to weathering and erosion.

Japan acknowledged the value of Dokdo Island after the Russo-Japanese War of 1905. Japan unilaterally transferred Dokdo Island to Shimane Prefecture, Japan and renamed it "Dakesima". A few authorities in Japan have continuously declared their dominion,
over the island, which led to diplomatic
conflicts between Korea and Japan. It is still
unresolved.
Presently there are security guards on Dokdo Island. Houses were built on the rocks as well as a small harbor. Some fresh water have also been found on the island, supplying safe drinking water for its inhabitants.

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home